Do you know where you’re going?

 

 

I spent too long drifting when I was younger. Or at least not reflecting on where it was I really wanted to go. I used to think the song, “Driftwood” by Cast, was written all about me.

I guess I don’t want other people to fall into that same all-too-easy groove of being aimless, and not being at the helm. Of being carried along towards someone else’s destination. Of being adrift in the middle of a wild ocean. Of running the risk of being even more scared than facing the inner fears of being ourselves.

Time to get a compass, set sail and be the helmsman within.

What helps you be more focused on your goals?

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18 responses

  1. Great sentiment. I, too, have felt lost a few times (And I’m still so young!), but I find the hard times that follow always “ground” me in what really matters. For me, it’s learning, writing, fellowship, and service. I always try to work my life around those, and I find that when I feel stagnant or lost, I’m lacking one or more.

    1. Thanks, Brett. I really like this approach. It’s less focused on the specifics and “where” and more centred on the ways of being which are so important. I respect you for the importance of “service” to others in your life. Totally agree.

      1. Thanks, I appreciate that. So far it’s served me well. I hope that continues.

  2. I’ve been reflecting on being a drifter lately. I’m in my early 30s at most of my friends are in a steady relationship, owning cars/houses and now the “in thing” appears to be having kids. I’m not like them at all, I’m still flatting, have a good job but when I’m not spending money in health issues I’m saving for travel! I spend a few years in my hometown, the head offshore for 1-2 years, come back… Leave again… Etc.

    Perhaps it’s time to stop drifting and commit to a country/town. Who knows. All I know is I’m treading water at the moment!

    1. Hi Julia. Thanks for your open-ness. Sounds like you’ve been having some amazing experiences. The fact that you have a decent job is a huge reassurance for you. That was one of my biggest problems in my 20′s. I too did a lot of travelling and had lots of new adventures. This sense of wanderlust, flexibility, lack of anchor(no mortgage etc) and freedom, can be the envy of those people who settle earlier; but I guess it’s a question of “how long do you want it?”. The chances of meeting someone who allows you to be your wonderful adventure-seeking self are just as likely on the road as they as are staying put I imagine. If you are being yourself, which it sounds like you are, then things will unfold as they are meant to for you. Many of my friends settled 5-10 years before me but I also found new friends 5-10 years younger ( including my wife!). I wish you well.

  3. from how you describe yourself, I guess I’m exactly the opposite. at age 20, my intuition spoke far louder than the general or conventional ideas of how or what life is, so I just didn’t go out there and say: “oh so that’s how life suppose to be like”. also, there was an “explode” of vision or intellectual sense of “direction”. but by no means that all of these are strong and solid (conventionally speaking)……because: this is only half the story.

    I honestly can not further talking unless, at least, one understands the philosophy of Zen, but suffice to say that, the stronger the sense of you, the sense of “I”, the harder it is to “come home”.

    from my position, now, at the age of 32, it is no different at all whether or not one has a sense of direction in life. a poem by Rumi might explain it better:

    You are in love with me, I shall make you perplexed.
    Do not build much, for I intend to have you in ruins.
    If you build two hundred houses in a manner that the bees do;
    I shall make you as homeless as a fly.
    If you are the mount Qaf in stability.
    I shall make you whirl like a millstone.

    1. This is thought-provoking, thanks. I will read more Rumi.

  4. from how you describe yourself, I guess I’m exactly the opposite. at age 20, my intuition spoke far louder than the general or conventional ideas of how life should be, so I just didn’t go out there and say: “oh so that’s how life suppose to be like”. also, there was an “explode” of vision or intellectual sense of “direction”. but by no means that all of these are strong and solid (conventionally speaking)……because: this is only half the story.

    I honestly can not further talking unless one understands the philosophy of Zen, but suffice to say that, the stronger the sense of you, the sense of “I”, the harder it is to “come home”.

    from my position, now, at the age of 32, it is no different at all whether or not one has a sense of direction in life. a poem by Rumi might explain it better:

    You are in love with me, I shall make you perplexed.
    Do not build much, for I intend to have you in ruins.
    If you build two hundred houses in a manner that the bees do;
    I shall make you as homeless as a fly.
    If you are the mount Qaf in stability.
    I shall make you whirl like a millstone.

  5. Great question. It is important for us to reflect and decide what is the purpose of our lives. Why are we here on this planet? Once we know this our direction is set.
    Thanks & regards :)

    1. Ain’t that the truth:)

    2. Posted on incredible, that was a very good read. In cocisulnon, someone who actually thinks and understands what they are blogging about. Quite difficult to find of late, especially on the web . I bookmarked your web blog and will make sure to keep coming back here if this is how you always write. thank you, keep it up! .

      1. Hi Cenk, a really encouraging comment. Thank you. I’ll do my best to do my best. Have a TipTop weekend.

    3. A nice and calm image for sure, but it doesn’t compete with the daarmtic feel of the previous material in your portfolio. At least that’s my opinion.

      1. Hi Yohana, thanks for this insightful feedback. I’m interested in Dharma so will try to keep it in mind and bring into play along with other strands to the blog.

  6. Damn, you came along too late!

    One of life’s tragedies: “Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise.”

  7. Thanks for this honest feedback and insight. It’s important to me to understand and grow.I will think about this when I do my drawings. I guess some ideas will never apply to everyone but you’ve got me thinking. I will include the use of “a reality check filter” and try to focus on universal truths a bit more.

  8. For far too many in America that are politically and economically disenfranchised these days the idea has no possibility or reality.

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